Tag Archives: Christopher Hope

Christopher Hope reviews André Brink’s A Fork in the Road in The Guardian

  
“The real kick in this book comes last.  After supporting all his life the vision of a better way for all in South Africa, Brink is appalled by what change has brought and he is not afraid to say so.  He tears into a governing elite who resemble nothing so much as the brigands they suceeded – who substitute for the vox populi of the ballot box the vox dei of the ruling party; preside over a “tsunami” of crime and violence that terrorises everyone in the country; prefer quackery to antiretroviral drugs in the fight against Aids; and unapologetically back tyrannies from Burma to Sudan and Zimbabwe.”

To read Christopher Hope’s full review of A Fork in the Road (Harvill Secker) click on the above link.

An interview with Christopher Hope

Born in 1944 in Johannesburg, Christopher Hope was educated at Wits University and the University of Natal. He worked as a journalist in South Africa before moving to Paris and then London in 1975.

Hope has published four poetry collections: Whitewashes (1971), Cape Drives (1974), In the Country of the Black Pig (1981) and English Men (1985). He has also written nine works of fiction. His first novel, A Separate Development (1980), was banned in South Africa, but won Britain’s David Higham Prize for Best First Novel. Kruger’s Alp (1984) won the Whitbread Novel Award; Serenity House (1992) was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. He has published four volumes of non-fiction: the autobiographical White Boy Running (1988), Moscow! Moscow! (1990), Signs of the Heart: Love and Death in Languedoc (1999) and Brothers Under the Skin: Travels in Tyranny (2003).

A playwright, broadcaster and journalist, Hope has travelled widely in Russia, Yugoslavia and Southeast Asia. He has written for The Guardian, The Sunday Times, The Independent, The New Yorker and Le Monde. He lives in France and visits South Africa regularly.

Read my interview with Christopher here.