Tag Archives: Dorothy Wordsworth’s Grasmere Journal

Daffodils, daffodils, daffodils

for those of you in the Northern Hemisphere …
 
 
 
    
“When we were in the woods beyond Gowbarrow Park we saw a few daffodils close to the water-side. We fancied that the lake had floated the seeds ashore, and that the little colony had so sprung up. But as we went along there were more and yet more; and at last, under the boughs of the trees, we saw that there was a long belt of them along the shore, about the breadth of a country turnpike road.
   
I never saw daffodils so beautiful. They grew among the mossy stones about and about them; some rested their heads upon these stones, as on a pillow, for weariness; and the rest tossed and reeled and danced, and seemed as if they verily laughed with the wind, that blew upon them over the lake; they looked so gay, ever glancing, ever changing.”
  
– Dorothy Wordsworth’s Grasmere Journal, 15 April 1802