Tag Archives: Jeanette Winterson

Magic is alive

     
“I don’t think magic belongs to one culture or another. It is a part of family, history, tradition – it is everywhere.”
     
– Alice Hoffman
              
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Recommendations
  
The House of the Spirits, Isabel Allende


 
 
Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands, Jorge Amado

     
  

Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon, Jorge Amado

      
              
 
The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov

      

 
Invisible Cities
, Italo Calvino


                   
 
Nights at the Circus, Angela Carter

     

 
The Magic Toyshop
, Angela Carter

 
The Bloody Chamber
, Angela Carter


  

Like Water for Chocolate, Laura Esquivel

 
Love in the Time of Cholera
, Gabriel García Márquez

 
One Hundred Years of Solitude
, Gabriel García Márquez

     

 
Chocolat
, Joanne Harris

     

   
The World to Come, Dara Horn

     
 
  
The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Milan Kundera

     

 
The Third Policeman
, Flann O’Brien

     

 
The Famished Road
, Ben Okri

     

   
Songs of Enchantment, Ben Okri

     

 
Stars of the New Curfew
, Ben Okri

     

 
My Name is Red
, Orhan Pamuk

  
Bel Canto, Ann Patchett

     

 
Jitterbug Perfume
, Tom Robbins

    

 
Midnight’s Children
, Salman Rushdie

     

  
The Ground Beneath Her Feet, Salman Rushdie

     

 
Of Bees and Mist
, Erick Setiawan

 

     
The Girl with Glass Feet, Ali Shaw

     

 
Perfume: The Story of a Murderer
, Patrick Süskind

     

 
Broken Things
, Padrika Tarrant

  
    

Lighthousekeeping, Jeanette Winterson

        
  


  
More magical writers

    
Kathleen Alcalá, Aimee Bender, Louis de Bernières, Jorge Luis Borges, Ray Bradbury, A.S. Byatt, Guillermo Cabrera Infante, Peter Carey, Alejo Carpentier, Susanna Clarke, Julio Cortazar, Mia Couto, Katherine Dunn, Louise Erdrich, Jeffrey Eugenides, Connie May Fowler, Janet Frame, Carlos Fuentes, Neil Gaiman, Günter Grass, Mark Helprin, Alice Hoffman, Zora Neale Hurston, Franz Kafka, Kelly Link, Yann Martel, Zakes Mda, Toni Morrison, Haruki Murakami, Audrey Niffenegger, Milorad Pavic, Lily Prior, Jonathan Safran Foer, José Saramago, Amy Tan, Luisa Valenzuela, Mario Vargas Llosa, Alice Walker, Virginia Woolf, Carlos Ruiz Záfon

Midsummer Nights

“For me, opera is a place where all the emotions can be fully felt yet safely contained. Certainly this has therapeutic value, but art is not therapy – at least not principally so: it is a profound engagement with life itself, in all its messiness, its glory, its fear, its possibility, its love.”
 
– Jeanette Winterson, Introduction to Midsummer Nights (Quercus Publishing, 2009)
 
In celebration of the Glyndebourne Festival of Opera’s 75th anniversary, British novelist Jeanette Winterson has compiled a collection of opera-inspired stories by contemporary writers. Contributors to Midsummer Nights include Alexander McCall Smith, Ali Smith, Andrew Motion, Andrew O’Hagan, Anne Enright, Colm Tóibín, Jackie Kay, Joanna Trollope, John Mortimer, Julie Myerson, Kate Atkinson, Kate Mosse, Lynne Truss, Marina Warner, Ruth Rendell, Sebastian Barry, Toby Litt and Jeanette Winterson.
 
Read Jeanette’s Midsummer Nights Introduction and story, ‘Goldrush Girl’.
 
Jeanette writes about the Glyndebourne experience for The Independent.
 
Read Lavinia Greenlaw’s review in The Financial Times.
 
Read Catherine Taylor’s review in The Sunday Times.

Jeanette Winterson on gardening and writing

 
“I learned to garden the way I learned to write – out of necessity.  We needed vegetables and flowers, and I needed to tell myself a long story about life – I am still telling it – a kind of beanstalk that grows and grows, and I can climb it, both to escape the possibility of life at the bottom, and to find another world where giants and castles and harp-playing hens are still to be found.
 
Gardening, like story-telling, is a continuing narrative.  One thing leads to another.  Like stories, there is always something going on in the garden long after the gardener has gone to bed.  The thing grows, unfolds, changes, develops a maddening life of its own.  For me, as a writer, I go to sleep with an idea in my head, and it takes hold during the night.  I open the back door in the morning, and the tulips that refused to look at me the night before, have opened in the sun.”
 
– Jeanette Winterson
 
Read the article here.

Writing objects to the lie that life is small

 
“Writing objects to the lie that life is small.  Writing is a cell of energy.  Writing defines itself.  Writing draws its viewer in for longer than an instant.  Writing exhibits boldness.  Writing restores power to exalt, unnerve, shock, and transform us.  Writing does not imitate life, it anticipates life.”
 
– Jeanette Winterson

Jeanette Winterson writes about her father’s death

“When I look at my life I realise that the mistakes I have made, the things I really regret, were not errors of judgement but failures of feeling.”

– Jeanette Winterson

Read Jeanette Winterson’s January column on the death of her father here.